Cancer: Causes and Consequences – Mary McBride, Distinguished Scientist with BC Cancer
Feb
19
7:30 PM19:30

Cancer: Causes and Consequences – Mary McBride, Distinguished Scientist with BC Cancer

One in two Canadians is expected to develop cancer during their lifetime, and one out of four Canadians is expected to die from the disease. In fact, cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada, responsible for 30% of all deaths.

At the same time, survival rates for cancer are increasing. This, combined with a growing and aging population, means that approximately 900,000 Canadians are living up to 10 years beyond their cancer diagnosis; others are living even longer. 

What causes cancer and how can we reduce the risk? What are the differences between types of cancers? What supports are available for those affected by cancer? How can ill-health from cancer be reduced and survival increased?

Mary McBride – an epidemiologist, health services researcher, and Distinguished Scientist in Cancer Control Research at BC Cancer for nearly 40 years – joins us for a wide-ranging discussion about cancer.

McBride is a Clinical Professor at UBC’s School of Population and Public Health as well as an Associate Member of the Department of Pediatrics, an Affiliate Member of the Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, and an Affiliate Member of the Child and Family Research Institute.

McBride is currently Program Leader for a research program involving youth with cancer in BC. She is also Provincial Lead for a multi-province study of the health and health care of breast cancer survivors. She has led or co-led many other studies including on powerlines and childhood leukemia, and cell phones and brain tumours.

Please join us for an important and highly informative conversation with a leading scientist—on a topic that affects us all!

Aletha Humphreys – a former manager and director with BC Cancer who now serves as Executive Director of Salt Spring’s Greenwoods Eldercare Society – will moderate the discussion.

Tickets are currently on sale at ArtSpring – 250-537-2102 and online – and Salt Spring Books. $20 - General; $15 - 2019 Forum Members. Students and low-income residents email forum@saltspringforum.com.

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

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Donald Trump and International Relations: UBC Student Workshop
Mar
9
to Mar 10

Donald Trump and International Relations: UBC Student Workshop

  • Gulf Islands Secondary School (Multipurpose Room) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join students from the University of British Columbia who will present research papers on topics relating to Donald Trump and international relations. This free and highly informative workshop is open to the public with any donations greatly appreciated at the door.

The workshop takes place on the following dates:

  • Saturday, March 9th from 3:00 PM to 6:30 PM

  • Sunday, March 10th from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM

This workshop is sponsored by Country Grocer

This workshop is sponsored by Country Grocer

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Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century — Kathryn Sikkink, Professor of Human Rights, Harvard University
Mar
20
7:30 PM19:30

Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century — Kathryn Sikkink, Professor of Human Rights, Harvard University

“Governments do not hand democracy and human rights to their citizens on a platter. People struggle for them.” – Kathryn Sikkink

China has detained over a million Uyghur Muslims, several countries sentence LGBTQ individuals to death, and Canada arrests First Nations for peacefully trying to protect their traditional lands. With many struggles still happening worldwide, it would be easy to believe that the international human rights movement is in jeopardy. But in actual fact, genocide and violence against civilians have been declining, while access to healthcare and education has increased dramatically worldwide.

What is the history of human rights? What is the current state of human rights? How can human rights advances be supported and sustained?

To learn the answers to these questions, please join Professor Kathryn Sikkink in discussion at the Salt Spring Forum!

Sikkink is Professor of Human Rights Policy at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, where she works on international norms and institutions, transnational advocacy networks, the impact of human rights law and policies, and transitional justice.

Sikkink’s latest book, Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century, draws on decades of research and fieldwork to rebut pessimism about the state of human rights and their supporting institutions. Sikkink argues that although change comes slowly and as the result of struggle, human rights movements have been incredibly effective over the long term.

A former Fulbright Scholar and Guggenheim Fellow, Professor Sikkink is a member of the American Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Don’t miss this conversation about one of the great issues of our time!

Stay tuned — tickets will go on sale soon.

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

Host Aroop Mukharji interviews Harvard professor and political scientist Dr. Kathryn Sikkink about human rights, her new book "Evidence for Hope: Making Human Rights Work in the 21st Century" (Princeton University Press 2017), and shortbread.

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National Security under Threat: Russia, China & the leaderless West – Richard Fadden, Former Director of CSIS
Apr
4
7:30 PM19:30

National Security under Threat: Russia, China & the leaderless West – Richard Fadden, Former Director of CSIS

How concerned should Canadians be about foreign interference in our upcoming federal election? Should Canada ban China’s Huawei 5G technology due to concerns over national security? Why is Canada selling arms abroad to countries like Saudi Arabia – and what would happen if we stop doing so?

Join former Director of CSIS Richard Fadden to understand the toughest issues facing Canadian national security.

Richard Fadden was the National Security Advisor to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau from 2015 to 2016. Previously, he was the Deputy Minister of National Defence, the Director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Deputy Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, and the President of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Fadden has never been shy about speaking out national security threats. In 2010, while still Director of CSIS, he warned that a number of municipal and provincial politicians in British Columbia were probably under Chinese government influence. Since his retirement in 2016, he has given numerous interviews and written op-ed articles calling for Huawei to be banned from supplying equipment to Canadian 5G networks.

Do you read John le Carré novels or watch James Bond movies? Don’t miss this “you only live twice” opportunity to speak with Canada’s version of “M”!

Stay tuned — tickets will go on sale in mid-February.

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

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POSTPONED – Life on the Edge: The Challenges of Small Communities with Tourist Economies – Josie Osborne, Mayor of Tofino
Feb
8
7:30 PM19:30

POSTPONED – Life on the Edge: The Challenges of Small Communities with Tourist Economies – Josie Osborne, Mayor of Tofino

Tonight's event with Mayor Josie Osborne is POSTPONED due to the weather. If you purchased tickets, please hang on to them because we will be rescheduling the event ASAP. If the new date does not work you, we will refund your tickets then. Do stay tuned! Thank you for understanding and we look forward to hosting Mayor Osborne soon.

Small communities with tourist economies like Salt Spring Island and Tofino face many challenges and opportunities. How does tourism affect small communities? Can such communities thrive year-round? Can they provide “living wage” jobs? Can they be environmentally sustainable? What lessons can Salt Spring and Tofino learn from each other?

Join the Salt Spring Forum for a discussion about thriving and sustainable small communities with Josie Osborne, the Mayor of the District of Tofino, who was recently re-elected to a third term.

A self-described ‘community builder,’ Osborne grew up on Vancouver Island immersed in her parents’ small businesses and mentored in community service by them.

After completing university, Osborne moved to Tofino to pursue a career in marine biology and environmental education. Fifteen years later, she became a small business owner. She also chaired the board of Tofino’s destination marketing organization, Tourism Tofino.

As mayor of a progressive rural municipality, Osborne’s primary interests are governance, civic engagement and communication. In addition to her mayoral duties, Osborne currently chairs the board of the Island Coastal Economic Trust (ICET) while also serving on the BC Clean Growth and Climate Action Advisory Council.

Join Josie Osborne for a unique comparative perspective on small community governance, tourism, sustainable development, and more!

Tickets are available at ArtSpring – 250-537-2102 and online – & at Salt Spring Books. $15 – 2019 Forum Members; $20 General Public. Students & low-income residents contact forum@saltspringforum.com.

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

This event is sponsored by Country Grocer

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